Holiday Hosting
1 - 20 of 41 Results
1 - 20 of 41
Holiday Hosting
  • Lobster Tamales with Poblano-Corn Sauce

    These elegant and unusual tamales are celebration-worthy! The masa dough may be made up to three days in advance, and the sauce may be made earlier in the day and gently re-warmed. It can be fun to have guests help fill, fold and tie the tamales—or you can get them ready several hours ahead and steam them just before serving.

  • Perfect Pumpkin Pie & Candied Walnuts

    I became obsessed with creating the perfect pumpkin pie and made at least a half dozen variations. My testers and I agreed it was time to stop when we tasted this one with its miracle of an eggless custard filling that’s both sweet and spicy. And if you were wondering, there is absolutely no taste at all of tofu.

  • Mashed Potatoes with Cauliflower Crumb Crust

    The cauliflower crumb crust adds welcome crunchy texture and lovely buttery-parmesan flavor (with no bread!) to creamy mashed potatoes.

  • Cheddar Topped Savory Butternut Squash and Apple Crème Brûlée

    Autumn flavors take center stage in this squash crème brulee with flavors reminiscent of pumpkin spice.

  • Molasses and Black Pepper Quail with Rum, Honey and Grape Reduction

    For a beautiful and elegant meal, serve two quail per person—and by all means encourage diners to pick up the legs and eat with their hands!

  • Pastrami Panini with Onion Jam and Swiss

    This umami-packed upgrade of the classic pastrami sandwich delivers layer upon layer of savory Brooklyn-inspired flavor.

  • Soy Braised Pork Belly with Chinese Steamed Buns

    One of the keys to the deep, savory flavor of the of the braise is what’s known as “thin” or “superior” or “premium” soy sauce. It is also occasionally referred to as light soy sauce—but don’t confuse that with low sodium! Thin soy sauce is actually saltier and lighter in color than regular soy sauce. Buy the buns at your local Chinese market: look in the freezer section for folded, not round, buns.

  • Gingerbread Crepes Topped with Ginger Cranberry Compote

    These gingerbread crepes are the perfect holiday dessert. Full of ginger flavor and topped with a creamy vanilla bean mascarpone filling and a ginger cranberry compote.

  • Sufganiyot (Chanukah Jelly Donuts)

    These fried round jelly doughnuts are one of many fried foods often served on Chanukah to commemorate the miracle of the Temple oil.

  • Sephardic Moroccan Cornish Hens with Olives and Apricots

    A Cornish hen, or Rock Cornish hen is simply a broiler-fryer chicken that weighs between one and two pounds. When split, it ensures each diner gets both white and dark meat, and makes a lovely presentation.

  • Wine and Tomato Braised Brisket with Spicy Red Onion Jam

    The brisket can be made well in advance and frozen -- or make it the day you serve it to perfume the house with a heady savory aroma.

  • Blue Potato-Two Potato Latkes

    The addition of purple potatoes give these classic latkes a beautiful burst of color.

  • Apricot Rugelach

    The dough for this traditional Jewish cookie or pastry (it fits the bill as both) is rich and soft and must be made a day ahead and refrigerated before rolling out. We’ve filled these with apricot jam—but seedless raspberry, peach, strawberry and currant jellies are also wonderful. Rugelach freezes well and thaws quickly, which means it is well worth keeping on hand. But be warned: it is best to hide them in the back of the freezer, lest they disappear.

  • Lobster & Chives Deviled Eggs with Truffle Salt & Parmesan Crisp

    Not all deviled eggs are made the same way. These luxurious version of the standard appetizer uses lobster meat and truffle salt to elevate the classic dish. The addition of the Parmesan crisp may seem like gilding the lily but they are so easy to make that you might as well go all out and make them for a stunning presentation and nibbly bite.

  • Apple Cider Glazed Roasted Goose with Brandy Roasted Apples

    Nothing impresses a Christmas dinner crowd like a beautifully glazed roasted goose. Though it may seem daunting to make, roasting a goose is actually easier than roasting a turkey because it doesn’t require any brining ahead of time. The key roasting a goose is to pierce the skin all over with a needle or sharp knife to make sure the layer of fat under the goose skin renders out, leaving a super crisp skin. Be sure to save the goose fat for a later use like roasted potatoes. It’s liquid gold!

  • Rosemary, Gruyère and Garlic Potato Galette

    Making a potato galette is an easy way to impress. With a quick cook on the stovetop to jump start the cooking and a longer bake time in the oven, the outer potatoes get crispy brown while the inner potatoes are soft and luscious. The hardest part of the whole thing is flipping it over onto a platter!

  • Rosemary Flaky Biscuits

    The idea of making flaky biscuits may sound daunting but it really just requires you to fold the biscuit dough a few times to make the flaky layers of dough and butter. Don’t be scared, because the payoff in the end is a light and fluffy biscuit that flakes apart when you bite into. Totally worth the minimal effort involved.

  • Vanilla and Orange Scented Triple Layer Cake with Cranberry Apple Filling

    This stunning holiday cake is a fun weekend project. Each component can be made separately and refrigerated ahead of time, which makes assembling the cake fairly easy. The ermine frosting is an old fashioned cooked flour frosting which is a soft mellow frosting that complements the tart cranberry filling.

  • Crab and Bacon Beignets with Harissa Aioli

    This savory version of classic beignets is perfect for holiday parties; crab and bacon make them a fan favorite. Harissa is a spicy red pepper sauce that can be found at upscale grocery stores and online. The harissa aioli sounds impressively difficult to make but is actually quite easy. The trick is to go slow in the beginning as you add the oil.

  • Champagne Cake with Gin Buttercream Frosting

    New Year’s Eve deserves a celebratory dessert and what better dessert than one that uses sparkling wine in the cake? Don’t forget to brush the cake with the extra dose of Champagne before frosting. It gives the cake a little bit extra sparkle.