• Roast Turkey with Herbes de Provence and White Wine Gravy

    One of the biggest dilemmas in roasting a turkey is how to keep the breast from becoming dry and overcooked while making sure the thigh and legs are fully cooked. Brining ensures overall juicy meat in general while the technique of first roasting the bird upside down allows for the dark meat to get a jumpstart on the cooking. It also means the breast self-baste in the beginning with the natural juices running down over it. Turning the turkey right side up halfway through the roasting ensures a beautiful browned skin bird, ready for presentation. Don’t worry if the breast has indentations from the roasting rack once you flip it over. As it continues to cook, it will plump up.

  • Maple Sweet Potato Casserole

    The traditional sweet potato casserole with sticky sweet marshmallows on top is a classic favorite at Thanksgiving dinner tables. This re-imagined version brings it to a whole new level with a pecan crumble for texture as well as a sweet and fluffy brown sugar meringue piped on top. If you don’t like your sweet potato casserole candy sweet, just skip the meringue topping and bake it with the pecan crumble alone.

  • Apple Cranberry Cobbler with Pumpkin Biscuits

    One of the easiest desserts to make for a crowd is apple cobbler. There’s no need to fuss with pie crust and everyone can take as big or as little a serving as they want. The addition of the pumpkin and pumpkin spice in the drop biscuit topping makes this a new Autumnal classic, perfect for those looking to serve something a little bit different for Thanksgiving dessert or just looking to make an easy comfort dish to end a Fall or Winter dinner party.

  • Grilled Cheese Caprese with Balsamic Syrup Drizzle

    This is what happens when a simple grilled cheese sandwich grows up and learns the art of self-expression. The deep, rich umami (savory) flavor of the roast tomato provide the perfect foil for the creamy, rich cheese and the surprising tangy sweetness of the balsamic syrup.

  • Dill Pickled Baby Carrots

    Use real baby carrots with the greens partially on, and not “baby cut” carrots, which are much shorter and thicker, and are simply large carrots that are cut into a “baby carrot” shape.

  • Clams Rockefeller

    It is said that the original dish, Oysters Rockefeller, got its name because the sauce was as rich as the richest American, John D. Rockefeller. That may have been a compliment in the late 1800s, but times and tastes have changed. In this version using clams, the flavor of the seafood is enhanced, rather than obscured, by the sauce to allow the ingredients—and the cook’s finesse—to shine.

  • Chocolate Drizzled Coffee Brownies with Vanilla Egg Cream Shooters

    There are many theories about how the eggless egg cream got its name. One leading story is that this iconic New York soda fountain drink sounded richer and more luxurious when it was thought to have an egg in it—but was more affordable to the masses without it.

  • Blackened Green Beans

    While “blackening” was a traditional New Orleans method of cooking spice-rubbed foods over very high heat, with the right seasoning blend, you can get equally good result over medium high heat. The idea is to slightly scorch, or blacken, the surface of the food to give it a deep, rich, savory flavor.

  • Black and White Doughnuts

    The Black and White cookie is New York’s iconic dessert, recognizable everywhere as belonging to the heart and soul of the Big Apple. But, truth be told, not everyone loves the cakey cookies as much as they love the City. For those folks—and their Black and White Cookie-loving brethren, here’s a dessert that takes it to the next level—without losing the great New York spirit.

  • Beef and Chorizo Empanadas

    These baked empanadas are filled with a slightly spiced beef and chorizo picadillo filling that make them perfect for game day or holiday entertaining.

  • Shrub Cooler Cocktail Recipe

    A shrub is a fantastic way to preserve fruit at the peak of its season so that it can be enjoyed in the months to come. Get inspired by seeing what's available at your local farmer's market. This time of year in the Bay Area, there are myriad varieties of small plums available that are perfect for pies and jams, and especially shrubs. Watch how this cocktail is made HERE.

  • Lobster Newburg Crepes

    Lobster Newburg is a classic New York dish made popular in Delmonico’s, a Manhattan restaurant established in 1827. This luxurious dish, with lobster, butter, cream, sherry, brandy and thickened with egg yolk, was the epitome of upscale fine dining, became incredibly popular with the after-theater crowd in New York. The addition of the vanilla in a savory crepe sounds odd, but vanilla works with seafood and shellfish like lobster. Don’t be put off by the ingredients or name, as both the crepe and the Lobster Newburg filling are much easier to make than they sound.

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